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About Project Enginuity

A latinx woman in lab coat and protective glasses with arms crossed with laboratory in background.

About Project Enginuity

Program History

In 2021, the Dayton Area Chamber of Commence Minority Business Partnership and the Entrepreneurs’ Center joined forces to create Project Enginuity to serve as a platform to connect Black, Latinx and women founders with high impact technologies to the congressional mandated SBIR program. The SBIR program awards over $3.2 Billion in funding annually to entrepreneurs from across the county. Access to capital has historically been a barrier for expansion for many minority led companies. Through leveraging the outreach capabilities of the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce Minority Business Partnership and the training expertise of the Entrepreneurs’ Center, Project Enginuity was developed to assist innovators with applying for competitive SBIR non-dilutive awards through discovering the business value within their technology and developing new commercial pathways.

Name Origin

The word engine derives from Old French “engin,” ​from the Latin “ingenium”
—the root of the word “ingenious.” Combining the words “engine” and “ingenuity” a new term is born to symbolize the process of converting power into motion, or ideas into action. ​

This project is an engine for the ingenious; a playground for diversity of thought and innovation.​ We believe that Enginuity Sparks Innovation. We empower 
a new generation of entrepreneurs to Be The Spark.

Project Enginuity logo design process demonstrating logo spacing, logomark, brand identity, and use of typography in the design for Project Enginuity.
Project Enginuity design including 15 blocks of color variations to demonstrate brand colors within brand identity, including blue, navy, red, peach, green, teal, etc.

Brand Identity

To bring to life the Project Enginuity program, we created a dynamic series of brand elements designed to honor and appeal to our audience.

The typeface used within the logo is Halyard Display created by African-
American typeface designer Joshua Darden of Darden Studio. Using the bold letterforms in all caps, the sliced and dissected elements of the wordmark symbolize mechanized parts coming together.

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